The Limits of Whiteness: Iranian Americans and the Everyday Politics of Race

Event Date: Thursday, October 26 - 12:30 pm to 1:30 pm
Location: Humanities Building, Humanities Auditorium (Room 133)
Neda Maghbouleh

Based on her new book The Limits of Whiteness (Stanford University Press, 2017), sociologist Neda Maghbouleh shares the curious, under-theorized story of how Iranian Americans move across a white not-white color line. By contextualizing ethnographic data with neglected historical and legal evidence, she offers new evidence for how a “white” American immigrant group can become “brown,” and what such a transformation says about race in North America today. Free.

Neda Maghbouleh

Born in New York City and raised in Portland, Oregon, Neda Maghbouleh is assistant professor of sociology at University of Toronto. Her research addresses the everyday lives of racialized people, including a new study of Syrian refugees in Toronto, funded by the government of Canada’s Ministry of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship.

Co-sponsors

Photo by Romi Levine

Images from the Event

Flyer for event

The Center for Iranian Diaspora Studies at San Francisco State University kicked off with its Inaugural Lecture, The Limits of Whiteness by Neda Maghbouleh.

Limits of Whiteness book cover

Neda Maghbouleh’s book, The Limits of Whiteness –Iranian Americans and the Everyday Politics of Race was published by Stanford University Press, September 2017.

Neda giving her presentation

By contextualizing ethnographic data with neglected historical and legal evidence, Maghbouleh offers new evidence for how a “white” American immigrant group can become “brown,” and what such a transformation says about race in North America today.

Neda presenting with slideshow

Sociologist Neda Maghbouleh shares the curious, under-theorized story of how Iranian Americans move across a white/not-white color line.

Maghbouleh,Nobari and Karim together

Neda Maghbouleh, Neda Nobari and Dr. Persis Karim at the event.

Neda Maghbouleh

Neda Maghbouleh, is Assistant Professor of Sociology at University of Toronto. Her research addresses the everyday lives of racialized people, including a new study of Syrian refugees in Toronto, funded by the government of Canada’s Ministry of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship. (Photo by Romi Levine)

 

E-mail: persiskarim@sfsu.edu